The Crocodile God – looking for readers again!

The two Balangays in full sail
The two Balangays in full sail

Posting this informal synopsis again, because I’m about to ask Christian Mihai for some help with boosting my post.

“THE CROCODILE GOD’S” first draft is almost finished and I’d appreciate if my crew could read it and review it, or just leave some comments on the chapters so that the Inkitt admin will send it to an editor and get it on track for publishing.

I just updated with the latest chapter, so you won’t have to wait too long for the next one!

PLEASE LEAVE COMMENTS AND REVIEWS ON THE INKITT WEBSITE, NOT JUST HERE.

Sorry for the all-caps, but people love to NOT-follow my instructions, so I’ll repeat them at the end of the synopsis.

Anyway, “The Crocodile God” is about a Fil-American woman Mirasol who finds a hot Fil-Australian dude called Haik shipwrecked on the beach. He’s muscled and covered in indigenous Filipino tattoos, so think Jason Momoa’s Aquaman with shorter hair, an Australian accent, and REALLY FUCKING DARK SKIN.


Haik tells her lots of stories about precolonial Luzon, and soon Mirasol finds out he’s a fountain of precolonial knowledge because he’s the lost Tagalog sea-god that even she can barely remember anymore. He’s been having a reincarnation-romance with her for centuries, but their relationships have been soaked in trauma since Spain colonized the islands.

America doesn’t get off the hook either because Haik is the most literally undocumented immigrant ever, so he’s constantly triggering the government’s “BROWN GUY WITH NO PAPERS” alarms, so *they’re* constantly deporting him to the Philippines. Since Mirasol isn’t having that in this life, they decide to deport her too, because LOL SHE’S HELPING A CRIMINAL.

As a note to Maori readers, this first draft uses Paikea the Whale-Rider’s myth as a huge theme of “lost cultural ties to Polynesia.” In-story, some Maori sailors came to the Philippines [Insert prehistoric time] ago and told some Tagalog tribesmen the legend of their whale-rider ancestor, which naturally got popular in another seafaring Austronesian country. There’s lots of myth-embellishing and myth-forgetting and myth-can’t-remember-the-details on the human side, but Haik himself identifies as Maori by birth and Tagalog by adoption.

If I need to cut or edit the Maori-specific parts of the story, just let me know.

Have fun reading my frantic Tolkien attempt to patch my culture back together.

Again: PLEASE LEAVE COMMENTS AND REVIEWS ON THE INKITT WEBSITE, NOT JUST HERE.

THE CROCODILE GOD – by Jamie Legaspi.

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